The Shadowline’s Daughter is a mad colorful portrait of what sustains me in this beautiful and

sometimes challenging place. It’s about fishing, farming, and family, and my personal relationship to
home and tradition. I draw from the scenes, colors and patterns I encounter and I’m interested in
connecting to our collective experience. Our local landscape and lifestyle informs my work and inspires
me. The Shadowline’s Daughter is a collection of fragments of experience made precious through the
act of making, gathered together to tell a story.
I grew up in Homer in a fishing and skiing family, valuing creativity, history and individualism. I’ve lived
and traveled in Oregon, Wisconsin, California and Mexico. When my husband Dan and I moved back to
Alaska after years Outside, Homer seemed both wonderfully familiar and refreshingly new. I asked,
“What can I offer this place, and what can it offer me?” I looked toward the mountains, out at the ocean
and up at the sky. I closed my eyes and saw my brown fishing boots on the turquoise deck of the F/V
Shadowine. I saw the intense, wild colors of the forests and hills where I love to walk. And then I began
to paint.
When I paint, I get ideas out quickly and intuitively. I can transform a blank canvas into a sort-of-almost-
done painting within a few hours, but then I need to look at it for a long time. I will look at it for days,
weeks, months. I’m unconsciously solving the puzzle of the painting and waiting for that beautiful
moment of knowing where to go next. Experimenting and revising is a crucial element of my process.
I’m usually working on two, three or four paintings at any given time, in various stages. I’m always
striving to resolve the painting while honoring the freshness and freedom of the first sketch. I love to
play with this tension and I will often revisit the same imagery with this in mind.
I fiercely believe in the power of art to transform lives because it has transformed mine, over and over
again. I tell my two daughters that I never expect them to be perfect, but I expect them to be curious, to
try, to feel, to learn, and to always be open to change. I am driven by the need to create and am in touch
with my truest self when I’m painting.
Our local landscape and lifestyle informs my work and inspires me like no other place I’ve been. I grew
up in Homer in a fishing and skiing family, valuing creativity, adventure and individualism. I’ve lived and
traveled in Oregon, Wisconsin, California and Mexico. When my husband Dan and I moved back to
Alaska after years Outside, Homer seemed both familiar and fresh to me. I asked, “What can I offer this
place, and what can it offer me?” I looked down at my feet, I looked toward the mountains, out at the
ocean and up at the sky. I closed my eyes and saw my brown fishing boots on the turquoise deck of the
F/V Shadowine. I saw the intense, wild colors of the forests and hills. And then I began to paint.
The Shadowline’s Daughter is a mad colorful portrait of my experience of this place, Homer Alaska, and
the stories of a life lived here, in the place where I was born, the place that owns my soul.
I have always made art and I am my truest self when I’m lost in the mania of creating. I see my two
young daughters draw and I watch their visual representation of the world develop, change, short
circuit, and grow. With each new stage of their development, something is lost and something is gained.
The scribble suddenly becomes a stick and circle person, which is in turn replaced by a princess with
puffy sleeves and curly hair. They are creating their own record of this finite moment of their lives. I’ve
found it very freeing to think about my own art in the same way. My work is about fragments of
experience, made precious through the act of making, and gathered together to tell a story.
I went to a small school called Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland. When I graduated I was flush
with art making, confident and flippant and I easily gave, and then threw away, almost all four years of
my art. As adulthood set in - commercial fishing in the summers, dog sitting, housesitting, falling in love,
Wisconsin, California, more dog sitting- I fought to regain my sense of self as an artist. I felt unmoored
for a very long time.
When we moved back to Homer after years Outside, Homer felt both fresh and familiar to me. I asked
myself, what can I offer this place and what can it offer me? I looked down at my feet, I looked toward
the mountains and the bluffs, at the ocean and up at the sky, as we all do here. I closed my eyes and I
saw the color of my brown fishing boots on the turquoise deck of my dad’s boat, the Shadowline. I saw
the Kodachrome colors of the forests and hills where I walked every day. Then I began to paint. My
visual voice has its home here.
I fiercely believe in the power of art to transform lives because it has undoubtedly transformed mine,
over and over again. I tell my girls I never expect them to be perfect, but I expect them to try, to feel, to
learn, and to be open to change. This is what drives my art making. I’m inspired by moments, colors and
patterns drawn from my life, but I’m ultimately interested in the universal experiences. It is in the telling
and receiving of our stories that we find connection with each other and I hope people feel a personal connection to my work.
Copyright © All rights reserved.
Using Format